New Painting: Carmel

Pop Surrealist portrait by Arabella Proffer

12×12″ oil on panel. You can adopt her over here.

CarmelbyProffer

This painting I spent a lot of time on for a specific show at Auguste Clown Gallery in Melbourne. I shouldn’t have agreed to do the show, as making this painting took time away from work on my upcoming solo show. A week before I was to send it off to Melbourne, I got an email from Scott Listfield about what had been going on with Auguste Clown. Trust me, it takes a lot for artists to out a gallery — let alone in a bulk email.

I’m so glad I decided to not send it. The fallout was pretty quick you can see here, here, and here.

Auguste Clown still have a painting of mine in their possession — which I notice is no longer available online — and I am hoping they do the right thing and return it to me. It’s amazing they owe artists hundreds of thousands and they were jerking around collectors who bought work.

Whether it is blue chip galleries or Dorito chip galleries, I’m glad this whole thing became very public via social media. A lot of people don’t realize it happens on all levels; it is usually kept quite because the artists don’t want to be perceived as “difficult”, but it does happen and a lot more than you think. For this gallery to get in this deep, then disappear and close once they were called out very publicly, is certainly a more extreme example.

New Painting: Snow Dove

A little 5×7″ painting I did using the left over globs of paint from a larger commission I’ve been working on. I’ve had a bad habit since an instructor at Art Center College of Design told me to always squeeze out more than I need. Well, that gets expensive with oil paint, and wasteful in my case, since I always have tons leftover no matter the situation. It seemed silly to waste anymore.

SnowDove

 

“Snow Dove” oil on panel. $350.00

Process of a Double Portrait

Lately, I’ve been doing commissions with symbolism that had to be hinted at, but not in a heavy way. I’ve been working on this double portrait for a couple celebrating their ten year anniversary — and it was a surprise for the husband! It’s so difficult trying to guess about a person through secretly snapped photos, but thankfully, the likeness turned out very well.

This couple also had something terrible happen that they have overcome together. I found a few ways commemorate that without it being too “Captain Bringdown” or anything like that. We agreed it was supposed to be more on the lighter side, but with that hint of subversive whatnot that I tend to paint in my personal work as it is. This was a really special piece for me and I’m happy with the result.

I don’t normally like showing too much process with my work, but I decided to do photos from start to finish this time around. I never know if people see the stuff I do, or things that needed fixing. I must have gone over that background in various shades of grey and green for a week before I stopped messing around with it!

What you don’t see, is “Judge Judy” on in the background, and me yelling “STOP THAT” at my cats every 30 seconds. Working from home hasn’t been totally easy.

This was oil on linen.

V0

V1

V3

V4

V5

V56

V55

V6

V8

V10

V9

and varnished…

V75Proffer

 

click to enlarge if you want to see all the little detail (like every eyebrow hair etc.)

Print Giveaway: She Became a Duchess

I’ll be doing a print giveaway for my email newsletter subscribers only, sign-up if you’d like a chance to win her:

This is the last of my limited edition prints from a batch made in 2010.

Freid

Friederica of Vienwray (1804 – 1874)
Born into an old aristocratic family with a predisposition for smallpox, she spent her youth being passed from one distant relative to another (each dying within a year of the next) until age 16 when she was hired by the royal court theater as an actress. She gained the Queen’s favor as an amusing and attractive social weapon; when the Queen’s friendship with a lady in her circle had cooled, Friederica was invited to salons and galas as a replacement, a resounding snub against anyone who had fallen out of favor. Described by men who came to pay her tribute as ‘the highest creature’, it is not clear if they flocked to her for her charm, her acting, or her influence with the Queen. Setting her sights on those of the most eminent condition, she retired from the stage and married the Duke of Lernigo.

btw, the original painting is available at Parlor Gallery